Maritime emission rule change
01-18-2020, (Subject: Maritime emission rule change ) 
Post: #1
Thumbs Down Maritime emission rule change
https://www.cnbc.com/2019/03/01/biggest-...rices.html
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Might be a good reason why to start looking into getting your fuel mileage numbers up!
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01-18-2020, (Subject: Maritime emission rule change ) 
Post: #2
RE: Maritime emission rule change
Sounds like buncha hype as it never really calls the fuel diesel.. it's a "new" fuel made by further refinement of their "current" fuel.


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01-18-2020, (Subject: Maritime emission rule change ) 
Post: #3
RE: Maritime emission rule change
I’ve read this before. Ships can burn any kind of oil as fuel basically like a multi fuel engine of world war 2. So now it’s gonna e illegal to burn straight oil. Gonna e burning diesel basically.
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01-18-2020, (Subject: Maritime emission rule change ) 
Post: #4
RE: Maritime emission rule change
Lee said the complex refiners along the Gulf Coast will benefit from the fuel change and they can easily respond to the demand. “The U.S. is very well positioned,” he said.


User's Signature: It's hard to win an argument with a smart person, but it's damn near impossible to win an argument with a stupid person
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01-19-2020, (Subject: Maritime emission rule change ) 
Post: #5
RE: Maritime emission rule change
I read this somewhere, I think FreightWaves. The consensus there was that diesel prices would be going up as the transition happens, supply and demand. It sounded like it was going to be a real kick in the crotch to the ship owners, as not all ships can run on the ultra low sulphur diesel. More crippling regulations... We shall see.
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01-19-2020, (Subject: Maritime emission rule change ) 
Post: #6
RE: Maritime emission rule change
The diesel market isn't strictly priced by supply and demand. It's market based so it's governed more by the perception of supply and demand. Anywho, automotive fuel prices, at least here in the US, probably won't see much of an impact from this. Most likely the entire fuel supply chain will benefit from an increase in production and some streamlining in their processes. That's an old article, which means there's been ample time for refineries to get ready for the Jan 1st deadline.

I see 2 areas where this might have a measurable impact. 1) older engines that are not able (or optimised) to burn the fuel, and 2) higher cost to ship goods via water.

Personally, I think we need to stick EGR, DPF's and SCR units on all diesel engines and power plants around the world. It'll be the only way to force a solution to the problems that these systems create. Once everyone has to deal with them there will be more than enough demand for a better solution and the economic impact will be measurable across multiple industries, not just us poor truckers who complain way too much.

No, I don't actually want to see worldwide adoption of these systems. I just think it would be the perfect catalyst for the change that the trucking industry can't seem to get on it's own.


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01-19-2020, (Subject: Maritime emission rule change ) 
Post: #7
RE: Maritime emission rule change
https://dieselprogress.com/cummins-stage...ies-27654/

Here's to the future


User's Signature: It's hard to win an argument with a smart person, but it's damn near impossible to win an argument with a stupid person
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01-19-2020, (Subject: Maritime emission rule change ) 
Post: #8
RE: Maritime emission rule change
(01-19-2020 )hhow55 Wrote:  https://dieselprogress.com/cummins-stage...ies-27654/

Here's to the future

I remember reading about these engines and aftertreatment systems a few years back when they first announced them. I was wondering when they would finally hit the market. Eliminating the EGR should be a major boost to engine health and longevity. Are the US sold X15 on-highway engines going to be like this in the future?


User's Signature: "So long and thanks for all the fish"
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01-20-2020, (Subject: Maritime emission rule change ) 
Post: #9
RE: Maritime emission rule change
I would imagine that Cummins would go non-EGR worldwide. Makes no sense to keep these unreliable piles we currently get if they have something better. If it is better, LOL! Which leads to my next question..

Has anyone priced out the current all in one emission setup on the new X15 that is already on the market? And is it a three piece or modular unit, to replace the filters separately? Or is it an all in one unit which needs to be replaced in its entirety every year or two? It can't be much different than what Cummins is using in this non-EGR motor they plan to soon release.

I can only imagine what the cost will be, I am sure it will be stupid expensive in the beginning, to recapture the R&D and for the dealers to again rape us wholesale. I remember when my DPF cracked, $8000 to replace, + labor. I am sure these all in one units could easily hit $10,000 to $20,000, it would not surprise me in the least. When they charge $99 for a $4 petcock valve, or $150 to $200 for a $10 AC Dryer can, my thinking on the above is not out of line.
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 Thanks given by: marek4792





  
  
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