X15 Longevity
09-15-2020, (Subject: X15 Longevity ) 
Post: #1
X15 Longevity
We are a small regional carrier that runs about 12 trucks any given time. We have pretty much been trained to fear that 600,000 mile range with our 2013 Peterbilts and KW's with a CM2250 ISX. We stay on top of all recommended maintenance whether in the manual or on this page. We are looking at buying some trucks with X15 engines in them. Is there anything we need to know about them that may be different from what we are currently running before we purchase our next trucks?
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09-15-2020, (Subject: X15 Longevity ) 
Post: #2
RE: X15 Longevity
Here is a summary of typical causes of red engines failing prematurely these days...

* (power/torque abuse): bad/horrible rear end gearing in attempts to save fuel mileage by limiting low-rpm power output and increasing torque instead. - ISX Engines that are run with heavy fuel pedal positions (50% or more) below 1500rpm's or so shortens their life significantly. Better rear axle ratio gearing to keep the vehicle rpm range in the 1500 - 1900/2100 ranges when power is needed improves their lifespan by a lot. Programming the engine to 1850+ ft-lbs torque or more below 1500 rpm is the main culprit... not the horsepower setting. For example, A 1750 ft-lb/615HP ISX will outlast a 1850ft-lb/500 hp engine by as m uch as 200,000+ more miles under the same high-load applications.

* (oil-related abuse): Not putting a bypass filter on them to keep soot out of the oil. Not changing oil often enough according to average MPG. Using synthetic combined with extending oil changes eats away at cams and other components, is harmful too.

* (emissions systems abuse/neglect): Neglecting the egr and emissions systems until the lights are screaming at you.

* Not doing EGR tune-ups and cleaning/servicing Doser and other egr and emissions systems components 2 times a year. This would include not keeping track of engine soot levels in the oil regularly to give a clear picture how well the engine is running as a whole. This is to prevent any excess soot production, therefore minimizing all the emissions system problems and excess wear issues.

* (fuel pump of engine death scenario): Not replacing all the guts of the fuel pump every 400k miles (or equivalent hours) before they wear out/fail and rapidly take the engine out with them.

* Not setting overhead valves every 250k miles max (or equivalent hours).

* Not doing the 500k mile maintenance items (or equiv.hours) like crank shaft damper, coolant flush, and other things.

* Not doing the 750k mile (or equiv.hours) rod/main bearing replacement.

* (general engine neglect): Not replacing the air filter often enough. Not doing annual testing of the egr, intake and exhaust systems for leaks. Not replacing power steering filter every 2 years. Not replacing water filter every 3rd oil change. Not testing coolant quality for prevention of cavitation and liner damage when needed (depends on type of coolant). Not doing regular inspections of wiring harnesses, clamps,m hoses, etc. to ensure they are not going to rub thru or have potential future issues form age/deterioration.

- I am sure that I could come up with more, but these are the ones that come to mind on a whim. I also did not mention anything about the truck itself either.

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These modern engines do not fix themselves. They do not keep their own emissions systems and filters clean for squat. They do not operate as "no touch" equipment at all, and just like any diesel engine of the past... they hate low rpm and high torque, this despite what the manufacturer claims and pushes for these days... the track record of failures due to too tall gearing, terrible self-cleaning garbage half-0arssed claims, and subsequent trend of repeating failures of the enigne itself, damn near every system on the engine, the exhaust system, etc. speaks for itself.

If someone does not purchase equipment with these things heavily weighed and planned for up front,.. then sure, someone can certainly be lazy and pay into the manufacturers broken system of bleeding you dry every time you turn around, it only lasting half as long and having 2x more problems. This is how it works out here any more unless drastic steps are regularly taken to prevent it all. They make big money and take great efforts to ensure a truck owners plight of constant grief with these things. Their share-holders are counting on you to constantly have issues and buy parts form the big mfgr's + pay into the OEM network of over-prices repair facilities so that they can get paid their investment dividends.


User's Signature: ->: What I post is just my own thoughts and Opinions! --- I AM Full Of S__T!.
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 Thanks given by: JMBT
09-15-2020, (Subject: X15 Longevity ) 
Post: #3
RE: X15 Longevity
idk if this is common or if its engine by engine basis but my 2016 CM2350 doesnt have a coolant filter like my 871 did. it seems engine care items like the water filter are being scavenged to save on production costs of accessories while keeping the overall engine price the same it seems and you have to special order to get a filtered pump.


User's Signature: 2010 Lonestar - CM871 - 13sp - 3.70s, 2016 T680 - cm2350 - 13sp - 3.36s - skateboarder
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09-15-2020, (Subject: X15 Longevity ) 
Post: #4
RE: X15 Longevity
(09-15-2020 )Lonestar10 Wrote:  idk if this is common or if its engine by engine basis but my 2016 CM2350 doesnt have a coolant filter like my 871 did. it seems engine care items like the water filter are being scavenged to save on production costs of accessories while keeping the overall engine price the same it seems and you have to special order to get a filtered pump.

I have seen some with them, and some without them. Seems to be hit and miss.


User's Signature: ->: What I post is just my own thoughts and Opinions! --- I AM Full Of S__T!.
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