Rebuild
12-20-2020, (Subject: Rebuild ) 
Post: #10
RE: Rebuild
EGR Tuneups are key, maintain the systems, do not be afraid to learn and get your hands dirty.


User's Signature: 2008 ProStar, OEM 600hp CM-871, 18spd, 3:42, in framed in Rawze's driveway. Every day is a fresh new episode of, "The Twilight Zone"... Rod Serling lives rent free in my head. I can smell the Chesterfields.
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 Thanks given by: Volvo8873
12-20-2020, (Subject: Rebuild ) 
Post: #11
RE: Rebuild
To expand on the others:

Seems the newer the engine model, the sooner it typically needs a rebuild. Some of this is by design (ie: engineering trade-offs, emissions, cost savings) and some of this is because of increasingly bad maintenance practices. If I remember correctly from Rawze's Book (see links above) the cm2350's fall into the 500-700k range, on average. Now, that will vary depending on maintenance and abuse history.

As for signs that a rebuild is needed. Excessive blow-by, oil consumption over 1 gallon about every 4,000 miles, signs of significant metal debris in the system (metal having flaked off of cams/rockers, failed fuel pump, HIGH levels of iron in an oil sample, etc...), coolant in fuel, exhaust gasses entering coolant (excessive pressure/bubbles in coolant tank, results of coolant test strips), signs of bearing failure (such as high levels of copper and/or lead in an oil sample). Evidence of valve damage/malfunction. I'm sure there are others, I'm not an expert.

Often times it's a combination of things that require enough labor that a rebuild just makes sense at the time. Parts wear out eventually and it's usually more cost effective to do one larger job then multiple "smaller" jobs. For instance, I was burning a gallon of oil every 3k mi, had decent blow-by and discovered a bad lobe on my cam. For me it just made sense to do a full inframe instead of just replacing the cam and rockers.

As for cost. It might vary depending on exact parts needed. But you're looking at $15,000 for a new head, rebuild kit and typical odds and ends. If you have to replace other stuff it'll be higher. I spent $23,000 for the above mentioned parts AND a new fuel pump ($4k), new oil cooler, new cam ($2k) and rockers. As for typical shop labor, $5,000-$6,000 for a decent shop (not dealer) up to $8,000-$10,000 depending on extras and/or price gouging. These numbers are just meant to be a rough estimate and will vary based on your exact situation and needs.

Doing it yourself is NOT hard. BUT it does require certain specialty tools/equipment which could cost nearly as much as cheap shop labor to buy. Some might be borrowed or rented if you know the right people or certain tasks can be outsourced (such as counterboring the ledges for the liners). Simply put, it's probably more cost efficient for the normal person to schedule ahead of time a week or 2 of down time and pay a GOOD shop, like Mr. Hagg's place, to do the labor for you. If you have the equipment and basic skills then Quickserve has 99% of the information you need to do the job. The other 1% is available from people here.


User's Signature: Think for yourself. Question authority.
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 Thanks given by: Rawze , redbeard , hhow55 , Smiling lemon , Volvo8873 , JMBT
12-20-2020, (Subject: Rebuild ) 
Post: #12
RE: Rebuild
(12-20-2020 )Chamberpains Wrote:  Full disclosure: I was the gambler/loser for 10+ years till I found this site. Now Im the relaxed educated, highly profitable and more intelligent business owner. The 1st 10+ years was incredibly tough. The following 3 years now are getting ridiculously easier the more I act like a true business owner.
I was the gambler getting into this stuff, but have to learn somehow
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12-20-2020, (Subject: Rebuild ) 
Post: #13
RE: Rebuild
(12-20-2020 )JimT Wrote:  Doing it yourself is NOT hard. BUT it does require certain specialty tools/equipment which could cost nearly as much as cheap shop labor to buy. Some might be borrowed or rented if you know the right people or certain tasks can be outsourced (such as counterboring the ledges for the liners). Simply put, it's probably more cost efficient for the normal person to schedule ahead of time a week or 2 of down time and pay a GOOD shop, like Mr. Hagg's place, to do the labor for you. If you have the equipment and basic skills then Quickserve has 99% of the information you need to do the job. The other 1% is available from people here.
Special tools?
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12-20-2020, (Subject: Rebuild ) 
Post: #14
RE: Rebuild
You need the cutting tool for the liner ledges, tool to measure and properly set liners and measure liner heights. I would do the front main seal too, because odds are it is time for a new crank shaft damper, a special tool is needed for the seal. Also, the head lifting tool comes in handy too when removing and setting the head.

It will all run you around what? $5000 to $7000? Somewhere in that ball park depending on what you need and who you buy it from, quality or so so...

Me, not worth the investment, unless I had two or more trucks that would require an in frame.

That is why we have Mr Hagg.


User's Signature: 2008 ProStar, OEM 600hp CM-871, 18spd, 3:42, in framed in Rawze's driveway. Every day is a fresh new episode of, "The Twilight Zone"... Rod Serling lives rent free in my head. I can smell the Chesterfields.
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12-21-2020, (Subject: Rebuild ) 
Post: #15
RE: Rebuild
(12-20-2020 )Waterloo Wrote:  You need the cutting tool for the liner ledges, tool to measure and properly set liners and measure liner heights. I would do the front main seal too, because odds are it is time for a new crank shaft damper, a special tool is needed for the seal. Also, the head lifting tool comes in handy too when removing and setting the head.

It will all run you around what? $5000 to $7000? Somewhere in that ball park depending on what you need and who you buy it from, quality or so so...

Me, not worth the investment, unless I had two or more trucks that would require an in frame.

That is why we have Mr Hagg.


"head lifting tool"? Like a electric wench and a pry bar lol.

The liner cutting seems to be outsourced relatively easily.
I do not know about the damper tool, but i have seen the liner protrusion measures before.
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12-21-2020, (Subject: Rebuild ) 
Post: #16
RE: Rebuild
If you say so. I've only in framed one, so I'm not that up on things.


User's Signature: 2008 ProStar, OEM 600hp CM-871, 18spd, 3:42, in framed in Rawze's driveway. Every day is a fresh new episode of, "The Twilight Zone"... Rod Serling lives rent free in my head. I can smell the Chesterfields.
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12-21-2020, (Subject: Rebuild ) 
Post: #17
RE: Rebuild
I have never done a truck engine before but i have pulled heads off of cars, i figured it was the same concept except much larger
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12-21-2020, (Subject: Rebuild ) 
Post: #18
RE: Rebuild
(12-21-2020 )Smiling lemon Wrote:  I have never done a truck engine before but i have pulled heads off of cars, i figured it was the same concept except much larger

watching my inframe video series explains most of what need to happen.

as far as pulling the head off one ...




as far as breaking the initial seal with the block after all the bolts are out, I show how to do it at 10:24 in the video. After that, i talk about the lifting bracket Waterloo was referring to.


User's Signature: ->: What I post is just my own thoughts and Opinions! --- I AM Full Of S__T!.
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 Thanks given by: Smiling lemon





  
  
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