Old emissions vs new
05-24-2021, (Subject: Old emissions vs new ) 
Post: #19
RE: Old emissions vs new
Pretty damn sad in my book, as most any certified Cummins repair facility should be able to properly diagnose and repair an ISX. Not the case, I have been taken to the cleaners twice by three different Cummins shops, two before finding Rawze and one after, the most expensive one @ $38,000.00...

How many perfectly fine turbos and EGR coolers have needlessly been replaced over the years? I would say so many that Cummins still to this day can not keep up with their incompetent shops. Now we have the fuel pumps to throw into the mix, one of the most financially devastating items to come along in years.

The dealers and shops know these pumps have a lifespan of roughly 400,000 miles, yet rarely if ever say anything, don't fix what is not broken they say... We all know where that goes... These are licensed and certified Cummins shops and dealers, even their own corporate stores will not say a word and allow an unsuspecting customers engine to be destroyed. It is like some sort of sick and twisted movie, where they enjoy watching a man squirm as they crush him with a brick.

So, we have one shop in the entirety of the USA that can and will actually diagnose and repair an ISX to a healthy state. That is very very sad in my book.


User's Signature: 2008 ProStar, OEM 600hp CM-871, 18spd, 3:42, in framed in Rawze's driveway. Every day is a fresh new episode of, "The Twilight Zone"... Rod Serling lives rent free in my head. I can smell the Chesterfields.
replyreply
05-24-2021, (Subject: Old emissions vs new ) 
Post: #20
RE: Old emissions vs new
Just swapped out my imap, something I didn’t even know existed until I got on this website. I’m really grateful for all the guidance. Really excited to start copying your work and hope to get the results I want. And if all else fails I’m going to mr haggs in griffin GA. I used to live in GA when I was a kid I’m from Dallas GA.

Next up is the fuel pump because looking at the imap i know it hasn’t been fixed. I will have time to get it done on the weekend.


Attached File(s)Thumbnail(s)
   
replyreply
 Thanks given by: Rawze
05-24-2021, (Subject: Old emissions vs new ) 
Post: #21
RE: Old emissions vs new
(05-24-2021 )John Doe Wrote:  Just swapped out my imap, something I didn’t even know existed until I got on this website. I’m really grateful for all the guidance. Really excited to start copying your work and hope to get the results I want. And if all else fails I’m going to mr haggs in griffin GA. I used to live in GA when I was a kid I’m from Dallas GA.

Next up is the fuel pump because looking at the imap i know it hasn’t been fixed. I will have time to get it done on the weekend.

that thing painted red like that tell me that it likely has never been changed.


User's Signature: ->: What I post is just my own thoughts and Opinions! --- I AM Full Of S__T!.
replyreply
05-27-2021, (Subject: Old emissions vs new ) 
Post: #22
RE: Old emissions vs new
Well, you seem to have the right attitude. Hopefully you will read up, ask questions, endure the occasional brow beating for the things your doing wrong and forge ahead better in the end. Many of us have, and many more just want to argue every little thing, learn nothing and repeat garbage until they get kicked out. We're all here to find help for ourselves and give help back when we can. Don't be afraid to ask questions, but at the same time try to search out the answers first, either on forum, or through Quickserve (the free account you can set up with cummins to access any and all service and troubleshooting info about your engine) and get yourself an Inline 6 adapter and Insite 7.x.x software on an old laptop.

Going back to your original question, no, you can't just mix and match different engines and different aftertreatment systems. Technically it might be possible, but getting all the software to work together so that everything functions PROPERLY would be a monumental undertaking, if it can even be achieved.

As someone else also mentioned, the REAL problem is with the engine. Not the design specifically, but the (lack of proper) maintenance. Couple that with bad specs and restrictive/destructive parameters chosen by fleets who plan on dumping the trucks once the warranty expires. They don't care about how they have shortened the useful life of the engine by half or more, all they care about is how much money can they save by doing the least amount of work before they pawn it off on someone else. Finally, add in lazy and uneducated (as it relates to the care and operation of said equipment) drivers who beat the truck up just so they can make enough cents each week to pay their own bills. Now add the final layer of "service points", dealers and shops that have learned how to seize the opportunity to increase their own profits.

All that and more adds up to the sad state of repeated component failures and most shops being booked up for weeks in advance. Slap that band-aid on and kick it down the road, NEXT!

My grandfather used to tell me "that switch, there's only so many times you can turn it on and off before it breaks". And while he was mainly just trying to get young me to stop playing with the damn light switch, he had a profound point. Everything has it's limit. So, for a DPF that is constantly filling up with soot because of poor engine and sensor maintenance and bad driving and idling habits, it's only going to support so many regen cycles before it reaches it's limit. Same idea applies to all components. Sure, the newer engines and aftertreatent systems have benefited from iterative design improvements, but they are still just as neglected and abused as ever and will have their own problems in time.


User's Signature: I try to keep it simple, but as is usually the case, my word count rivals that of Dickens.
replyreply
 Thanks given by: hookliftpete , Rawze , Chamberpains




NOTE: Rawze.com is not affiliated, nor endorses any of the google ads that are displayed on this website.
  
  
Theme by MyBB Addict
Contact Us | Rawze.com | Return to Top | Return to Content | Lite (Archive) Mode | RSS Syndication