Fan clutch stuck? The tool I used to fix.
05-29-2019, (Subject: Fan clutch stuck? The tool I used to fix. ) 
Post: #1
Fan clutch stuck? The tool I used to fix.
I know more than a few of you know how to do this. This is my first time, and thankfully it worked. Just being long winded for the guys like myself that have read about using air to release a stuck fan clutch, have no clue on how, but want to know how. Also, some of the tools that make it a fairly easy and straight forward job.

Drove the truck yesterday, first time in months... The darn fan clutch was stuck, as in engaged and would not turn off. The fan clutch is a year old. My AC was blowing ice cold, so I ruled out low refrigerant and or a bad high pressure switch. No air leaks, solenoid appeared to be working when I used the switch on the dash, you could hear it working its magic... Except, it couldn't, as the fan was not disengaging.

Here is my fan clutch and how it works, to help better understand what I was doing, with photos. The fan clutch uses air pressure to stop the fan from turning. When air is tuned off to the fan clutch, the fan starts spinning. This link is very good at explaining this. https://kit-masters.com/tech-tips-auto-lock/

The fan override switch on the dash, at least in my truck, engages the fan. If everything is working normally, when you want the fan to go on, or engage, you turn that switch on. I would hit the switch to on, hear the air release at the solenoid. I then turned the switch off, pressurizing the fan clutch, except fan was still engaged. Not good.

Well, I tapped on the fan clutch with a small brass hammer, nothing. I needed air. I called up to FleetPride and spoke with Jeff. He told me to come on up, he had the fittings I needed. Sure enough, he had a push pull fitting that adapted to a male air compressor fitting, 5 feet of 1/4" air line and a 1/4" push pull union to join my fan clutch air line up near the firewall. Perfect! All cost around $15

I had to pull the air cleaner on the ProStar to get to the fan clutch air solenoid. I then went and drained the air tanks on the truck.

I broke out my quick release pliers to disconnect the two airlines, it would not have been possible without these pliers, as I could barely even get my one had to the actual fitting. If you do not have these quick release pliers and work on your truck, you need to seriously consider getting this kit. It has saved my bacon more than a few times, and has worked flawlessly every time I have used. https://amzn.to/2MeIqK0

I disconnected the two airlines to the solenoid, there is an inlet side from the firewall, and the outlet side going to the fan clutch. I then removed and inspected the solenoid, it looked good, wiring was still intact and not brittle, plug intact at harness and solenoid.

I hooked up my new air line adapter to the air line that heads up front to the actual fan pulley using that 1/4" push pull union fitting I just picked up. I plugged the other end of the 1/4' air line into my little Lowes air compressor and turned it on to build pressure.

I just let her gently build pressure while gently tapping on the fan clutch body with a small brass hammer. Right around 90 psi the fan clutch popped! it was disengaged!

Here is the brass hammer I used, 16 oz fit in there nicely. https://amzn.to/2HLB1xD

I then tested the solenoid, I wanted to be sure that was not the problem or had issues. I plugged in the solenoid to the motor harness. I then used the 1/4" push pull union to connect to the inlet air line going into the solenoid to my shop air compressor. I started the motor, and turned the fan override switch on and off. I could hear the whistle of air when I turned the switch off, and it stopped whistling when switch was turned on. Everything was working.

Buttoned everything up, gave it a test run, everything was working as it should. I guess we had a little lot rot in the fan clutch from sitting. This was a cheap diagnostic test with some inexpensive fittings and air line. I will add again, I highly doubt I would have been able to remove these airlines without those disconnect pliers, I can darn near guarantee that.

Here is what Jeff at FleetPride sold me.

./uploads/201905/post_218_1559164470_a1378de3587c795a0fcc9394143e0721.jpg

Here is your fan clutch solenoid... At least on a ProStar.

./uploads/201905/post_218_1559164967_47c4a0beb72f876e212dacaadc6862e2.jpg
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 Thanks given by: Techmech , multitask
05-29-2019, (Subject: Fan clutch stuck? The tool I used to fix. ) 
Post: #2
RE: Fan clutch stuck? The tool I used to fix.
When mine stuck a good slap of a channel locks with key on engine off got mine and hasn't been an issue since


User's Signature: 2010 Lonestar - CM871 - 13sp - 3.70s - skateboarder
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 Thanks given by: multitask
05-30-2019, (Subject: Fan clutch stuck? The tool I used to fix. ) 
Post: #3
RE: Fan clutch stuck? The tool I used to fix.
(05-29-2019 )Lonestar10 Wrote:  When mine stuck a good slap of a channel locks with key on engine off got mine and hasn't been an issue since

I used my hammer, would not bust it lose for nothing, until I was able to apply the air pressure directly. She went POP! And I went YEAH! I did not want to run this thing in to the shop for this, as I knew what the issue was, lot rot from sitting. Last thing I wanted to do was to smack it to hard and crack something, it looks die cast. But, now we all know that there is an inexpensive air fitting out there that can get the job done. Or at least I now know. These adapters should come in handy to check the airlines on the truck too if you have a good place to access the air system or isolate a line or component.
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05-30-2019, (Subject: Fan clutch stuck? The tool I used to fix. ) 
Post: #4
RE: Fan clutch stuck? The tool I used to fix.
Are the clutch disc's in the back replaceable? If it's like the old keyser hubs, you can easily pull the clutch disc out and give it a real light sanding to get the pieces of steel that embedded in it smoth again. This has kept mine from sticking for quite some time. Also, if it is held in by plates and 5\16th or 8mm head bolts, you can loosen these up real quick, give a tap or a spin of the fan to free it, then tighten everything back down.

Front view (side that faces the radiator)./uploads/201905/post_3285_1559201793_d3215b081ff8720c64f0df8dad423c8a.jpg

Back view (with clutch plates and 5\16 or 8mm head bolts)./uploads/201905/post_3285_1559201947_a7f55fe49f5d14f94cc4d62a2b0beacc.jpg

The actual clutch disc behind the plates that gets metal and steel and rust that you can lightly sand./uploads/201905/post_3285_1559202089_6ba78d3b6dd8fa715b7cfa9ce98cc184.jpg

Also, many of these kinds of hubs are called extended duty hubs. Because if your clutch is worn down to where it wont grip anymore, you can sinply flip the clutch plates and bolt them back on. They will push the clutch disc in even further and give you much more use out of it.

This isn't the 1 Waterloo has but I'm curious if the clutch is held in the same way. Instead of guys rapping on the hub housing and potentially breaking it, simply loosening bolts and freeing it up would be a safer recommendation.
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 Thanks given by: Waterloo , multitask
05-30-2019, (Subject: Fan clutch stuck? The tool I used to fix. ) 
Post: #5
RE: Fan clutch stuck? The tool I used to fix.
(05-29-2019 )Waterloo Wrote:  I know more than a few of you know how to do this. This is my first time, and thankfully it worked. Just being long winded for the guys like myself that have read about using air to release a stuck fan clutch, have no clue on how, but want to know how
...

crank truck, let air build up to 120- psi or so.

turn off truck, then turn key back on so that fan clutch has 120psi air pressure on it.

smack the side of the clutch with a hammer.

-- Although your method of applying air externally works, that same amount of air pressure (or roughly about 120-psi or so) is also applied if you simply turn on the key in the dash after the engine has stopped and the air is built up all the way.

That adapter is however handy for releasing parking brakes when you want to remove drums and work on brakes/hubs without having to build up the air. I use this compressor,..

https://amzn.to/2HKif9M

it is one of the more handy things that I have purchased for my truck and an adapter like you made for such things.


It is like one of those little car tire compressors, but on steroids and very well built.


User's Signature: ->: What I post is just my own thoughts and Opinions! --- I AM Full Of S__T!.
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 Thanks given by: Waterloo , multitask
05-30-2019, (Subject: Fan clutch stuck? The tool I used to fix. ) 
Post: #6
RE: Fan clutch stuck? The tool I used to fix.
(05-30-2019 )Chamberpains Wrote:  Are the clutch disc's in the back replaceable? If it's like the old keyser hubs, you can easily pull the clutch disc out and give it a real light sanding to get the pieces of steel that embedded in it smoth again. This has kept mine from sticking for quite some time. Also, if it is held in by plates and 5\16th or 8mm head bolts, you can loosen these up real quick, give a tap or a spin of the fan to free it, then tighten everything back down.

Front view (side that faces the radiator)

Back view (with clutch plates and 5\16 or 8mm head bolts)

The actual clutch disc behind the plates that gets metal and steel and rust that you can lightly sand

Also, many of these kinds of hubs are called extended duty hubs. Because if your clutch is worn down to where it wont grip anymore, you can sinply flip the clutch plates and bolt them back on. They will push the clutch disc in even further and give you much more use out of it.

This isn't the 1 Waterloo has but I'm curious if the clutch is held in the same way. Instead of guys rapping on the hub housing and potentially breaking it, simply loosening bolts and freeing it up would be a safer recommendation.

I don't know if you can flip the plates, but I do know there is a rebuild kit available through FleetPride for my particular clutch. I just did not want to go there, as that would entail taking the darn thing off, and I need to get this truck into service this week, LOL! I'm McTurtle when it comes to mechanics, LOL!
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05-30-2019, (Subject: Fan clutch stuck? The tool I used to fix. ) 
Post: #7
RE: Fan clutch stuck? The tool I used to fix.
(05-30-2019 )Rawze Wrote:  
(05-29-2019 )Waterloo Wrote:  I know more than a few of you know how to do this. This is my first time, and thankfully it worked. Just being long winded for the guys like myself that have read about using air to release a stuck fan clutch, have no clue on how, but want to know how
...

crank truck, let air build up to 120- psi or so.

turn off truck, then turn key back on so that fan clutch has 120psi air pressure on it.

smack the side of the clutch with a hammer.

-- Although your method of applying air externally works, that same amount of air pressure (or roughly about 120-psi or so) is also applied if you simply turn on the key in the dash after the engine has stopped and the air is built up all the way.

That adapter is however handy for releasing parking brakes when you want to remove drums and work on brakes/hubs without having to build up the air. I use this compressor,..

https://amzn.to/2HKif9M

it is one of the more handy things that I have purchased for my truck and an adapter like you made for such things.


It is like one of those little car tire compressors, but on steroids and very well built.

I was thinking the same, and that it wold eventually pop free. Initially I did like you said, built the air all the way up, 120+, and give her a few whacks with that brass hammer and manually turned the fan with my hand while whacking away, I got nothing. I was starting to panic, that this thing was not going to break loose, heck, it's only a year old. I called the manufacturer and he told me to try a direct air line and whack it, it worked, took all of a minute after hooking up the compressor. No clue what difference the shop compressor made, other than the pressure may have been greater than what the truck was actually sending to the clutch as I was bypassing the solenoid. Or, the solenoid was not active for some reason with the just the key on and not having the motor actually running. I'm thinking that may have been the issue as I believe the Cab Controller operates the engine fan as it is tied into the AC system. ?

And that compressor just went on my list... ;-)
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 Thanks given by: Rawze
05-30-2019, (Subject: Fan clutch stuck? The tool I used to fix. ) 
Post: #8
RE: Fan clutch stuck? The tool I used to fix.
The way we do it is remove the 3 plates on the rear of the fan hub and then give it a mild smack. Brakes free every time. THen apply air to make sure its moving then with air applied install the plates back on...
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 Thanks given by: Waterloo , multitask
05-30-2019, (Subject: Fan clutch stuck? The tool I used to fix. ) 
Post: #9
RE: Fan clutch stuck? The tool I used to fix.
Mr. Loo there may be a psi reducer before the solenoid or the solenoid itself may reduce the pressure to only 90 psi. They don't need more than that to operate and International is known to put reducers in line for a lot of things.

Mr. Hagg is spot on to what I do. Some times you don't even need to take the plates all the way off. Just loosen them enough to get the clutch disc to move and spin the fan by hand to break up any rust. Then tighten the plates back down.
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 Thanks given by: Waterloo , Rawze , multitask





  
  
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