Aftertreatment Temperature Stabilization
10-03-2020, (Subject: Aftertreatment Temperature Stabilization ) 
Post: #10
RE: Aftertreatment Temperature Stabilization
Another thing I have thought about... easier said than done though. Here I sit in a Farmhouse that my great-grandparents bought in 1942. I bought it 11 years ago and am about 90% through restoring it. I have been in business for myself here for 19 years and have built up a pretty good local customer base. Hard to uproot. Maybe I can get Trump to hold off on Mexico wall construction and build a wall between NYC and the rest of the state. Get us separated so the rest of us up here in the red counties don’t have to get lumped in with the “blue state” politics.
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10-03-2020, (Subject: Aftertreatment Temperature Stabilization ) 
Post: #11
RE: Aftertreatment Temperature Stabilization
(10-03-2020 )ahub86 Wrote:  ...
enable the aftertreatment dpf temperature stabilization feature
...

Just an update... It is called the "Stay Warm" feature in the programming. it is part of the 'Soot Filter Reduction' manager and the 'Emissions auXiliary reduction Manager' systems in the ecm. It essentially will extend the regen cycle and keep it active at low speeds for up to 10 minutes (then it times out) if it is in a regen and you slow down.

I would imagine this would consume more fuel, dumping it into the exhaust to keep the system hot while it is in this state. Guess it would be a trade-off of possibly more complete regen cycle on trucks that stop/go a lot at the expense of some extra fuel ... for up to 10 minutes before cancelling the regen cycle. -- just speculation based on what I have seen of it behind the scenes in the ecm programming.


User's Signature: ->: What I post is just my own thoughts and Opinions! --- I AM Full Of S__T!.
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 Thanks given by: ahub86
10-04-2020, (Subject: Aftertreatment Temperature Stabilization ) 
Post: #12
RE: Aftertreatment Temperature Stabilization
(10-03-2020 )ahub86 Wrote:  It’s ok if you don’t have a divisible load permit. If your truck complies with federal bridge law you are ok. But for example my tri axle dump truck would register gross at 58,000 lbs under bridge law. With the divisible load permit I am 73,750 lbs. Get caught with non steerable and they pull your permit for an extended period and it’s hard to get back. Get caught non steerable with 73,750 gross and then only good for 58,000. Stuck with an almost 8 ton overload ticket.

Plus the law is the steerable axle has to have a capacity at least 80% of the next axle in the group. So my truck must be a 20k lb to be next to an 23,000 lb axle of my 46k rears. Paving company near me has some trucks steerable, but only 13k. DOT couldn’t find a ID tag so they measured brake shoes and figured it out that way. Pulled permits and etc etc.. the paving company is hiring other trucks to run in the place of their three right now. It’s just one of those thing that I have been fighting but the writing is on the wall. Thank you King Cuomo

I just woke up, still have not had my first coffee... I have a ProStar with a steerable 8,000 lb lift axle in front of my 40,000 lb drive axles to assist in getting the weight off of my 12,000 lb steer axle. I never haul over 80,000 gross, do not require any permits to pull my 53' dry van. If by chance I go to NY, am I going to have any issues with the DOT up there?

From what I am comprehending in my currently foggy mind, is that I am ok if I do not require permits? Thank you. And NY sucks.


User's Signature: 2008 ProStar, OEM 600hp CM-871, 18spd, 3:42, in framed in Rawze's driveway. Every day is a fresh new episode of, "The Twilight Zone"... Rod Serling lives rent free in my head. I can smell the Chesterfields.
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10-04-2020, (Subject: Aftertreatment Temperature Stabilization ) 
Post: #13
RE: Aftertreatment Temperature Stabilization
Ok thank you. I had a basic theory myself of how this was going to work. Sounds like what it’s thinking coincided with what your telling me. I just couldn’t find any specifics about it when I searched anywhere. Like the 10 minute time limit. Maybe what I need to do is put the truck in service and just see show it goes with it off. Watching fuel mileage and regen history etc. for about half my busy season. Then enable it for the rest and compare. Maybe I can produce some real world data for the dump trucks out there.
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 Thanks given by: Rawze
10-04-2020, (Subject: Aftertreatment Temperature Stabilization ) 
Post: #14
RE: Aftertreatment Temperature Stabilization
I run dumpsters, before I had mine ‘fixed’, that feature was helpful,lots of stop and go and pro time, but it made about a -.5mpg difference when a regen ran. That adds up quick.
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 Thanks given by: ahub86 , Rawze
10-10-2020, (Subject: Aftertreatment Temperature Stabilization ) 
Post: #15
RE: Aftertreatment Temperature Stabilization
(10-03-2020 )Rawze Wrote:  Just an update... It is called the "Stay Warm" feature in the programming. it is part of the 'Soot Filter Reduction' manager and the 'Emissions auXiliary reduction Manager' systems in the ecm. It essentially will extend the regen cycle and keep it active at low speeds for up to 10 minutes (then it times out) if it is in a regen and you slow down.

I would imagine this would consume more fuel, dumping it into the exhaust to keep the system hot while it is in this state. Guess it would be a trade-off of possibly more complete regen cycle on trucks that stop/go a lot at the expense of some extra fuel ... for up to 10 minutes before cancelling the regen cycle. -- just speculation based on what I have seen of it behind the scenes in the ecm programming.

The "Stay Warm" has been helpful on school buses w/ 2350 ISB 6.7. Does Cummins have a Regen Inhibit option? The medium NAV MF engines I work with can have that option enabled. Very helpful in stop and go operations, in city, landscape dumps, short haul etc. Works well IF the drivers are not idiots. Big IF. Stops the engine from doing active regen on it's own. Used by a non idiot the truck is operated until the 1st stage DPF warning comes on. Operation can continue for a while.
Then when the truck can be out of service for 30 to 50 minutes a parked regen can be run. This strategy lets a complete regen run. This works well depending on the driver. What was happening before was the ECM commanded regens usually never got to complete. Truck would be stopped, or go under 7mph all of which stop the regen. Since the DPF didn't get fully "emptied" they would regen a lot. Since many of these use in cylinder dosing that would lead to fuel dilution and other problems.. Have not seen this option in INSITE on the ones I have looked at.

BTW may have a good "EGR tuneup" success story in a few days. Waiting on results.
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