ISX and Bypass Oil Filter Systems
08-17-2016, (Subject: ISX and Bypass Oil Filter Systems ) 
Post: #64
RE: ISX and Bypass Oil Filter Systems
(08-17-2016 )Inderjit Wrote:  Hey Rawze can I get part number the for the fitting at the inlet port of filter housing? Not the elbow but the other with a bend on it.

I don't know that part#. I did not install mine. Had it done a Jubitz a long time ago. -- Maybe someone else knows it?


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08-17-2016, (Subject: ISX and Bypass Oil Filter Systems ) 
Post: #65
RE: ISX and Bypass Oil Filter Systems
(05-15-2016 )stevesparts Wrote:  Well here's where i try to post a picture of my install of my bypass filter..
sorry it's a little blurry.

Hello steve. Can I get the part number for the blue fitting on the inlet port of this picture ?thanks in advance.
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08-17-2016, (Subject: ISX and Bypass Oil Filter Systems ) 
Post: #66
RE: ISX and Bypass Oil Filter Systems
It's a 3/8 thread with 1/2 jic
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08-30-2016, (Subject: ISX and Bypass Oil Filter Systems ) 
Post: #67
RE: ISX and Bypass Oil Filter Systems
When you do an oil change are you guys leaving the oil in the bypass filter alone? Or dumping the oil out of the filter then refill with clean oil and screw back on?
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08-30-2016, (Subject: ISX and Bypass Oil Filter Systems ) 
Post: #68
RE: ISX and Bypass Oil Filter Systems
(08-30-2016 )jimeneztrans84 Wrote:  When you do an oil change are you guys leaving the oil in the bypass filter alone? Or dumping the oil out of the filter then refill with clean oil and screw back on?

I used to check how clogged my filter was by simply running my hand from the bottom of it towards the top,... After cranking the truck, I would feel for where it was "warm" vs "colder" to see how clogged it was. If it was only the very 1/3 top if it warm,.. then I know it was time to change it.

I didn't mess with it otherwise.


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08-30-2016, (Subject: ISX and Bypass Oil Filter Systems ) 
Post: #69
RE: ISX and Bypass Oil Filter Systems
Cool thanks rawze!!
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08-31-2016, (Subject: ISX and Bypass Oil Filter Systems ) 
Post: #70
RE: ISX and Bypass Oil Filter Systems
The INFO from Amsoil îs that The filter should be good FOR 80k miles...imo depends how much soot that particular engine makes

I just performed the third oil change now used delvac before was rotella,((( 9k & 16k)) did dumped old oil each time...and refilled
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 Thanks given by: LargeCar
10-13-2016, (Subject: ISX and Bypass Oil Filter Systems ) 
Post: #71
RE: ISX and Bypass Oil Filter Systems
This is cross posted from the Shimmed Oil Pump thread as well...

So I finally got off me fat azz and finally installed my Spinner II 996 Bypass filter. Should have done this years ago, but I was told that ISX's do not produce enough oil pressure to properly propell the centrifuge. I spent some time on the phone with a very knowledgeable person from their tech support, and he said that info was wrong. A stock ISX oil pump will propell the centrifuge, but it will only run about 34-3500rpm. The optimum is 4500+, so it will work, but it's efficiency won't at its peak. Anyhoo...
As everyone here probably knows, I have shimmed my oil pump with the US$0.80 trick. I started the truck after the install was almost complete. I had the return line plumbed it, the air supply run and connected, the oil IN to the Spinner connected and the feed line ran. I did NOT connect the feed immediately. I ran the truck for about 1/2hr to achieve (close to) operating oil temp of 170*. I was running the DataLogger on Insite, so my oil pressure at 1200rpm was 47.0-47.9psi. I then shut the truck down, pulled the #5 feed port plug and installed the port fitting and connected the supply hose. Again on Insite running the DataLogger at 1200rpm my oil pressure was 45.8-46.4, giving a parasitic loss of 1.2-1.5psi of pressure loss to run a (rated) 2 gal/min Spinner bypass filter. According to the chart in the install instructions with 45psi it should be spinning the centrifuge at about 53-5400rpm and flowing about 1.7-1.8 gal/min.
Actually not as much pressure loss as I had expected it to be.
Note, this is on a fresh oil change with Rotella 15W40 and 1 gallon on Sta-Lube 80W90.


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01-23-2017, (Subject: ISX and Bypass Oil Filter Systems ) 
Post: #72
RE: ISX and Bypass Oil Filter Systems
I came across this today from cummins. it talks about why they do not recommend extended oil changes...

====================

Cummins does not recommend that oil analysis be used to determine maintenance intervals. Oil analysis only permits maintenance intervals to be estimated. Engines must be operated at the estimated interval for 800,000 to 1,100,000 km [500,000 to 700,00 mi] or 10,000 to 15,000 hours to determine if the estimated maintenance interval based on an oil analysis was correct.

If the interval is estimated correctly, the engine will remain in an acceptable condition for its operating environment. If an extended maintenance interval is guessed incorrectly, up to 50 percent of the potential engine life to rebuild can be sacrificed for the longer maintenance interval. For example; an engine with 3220 km [2,000 mi] per quart oil consumption during the first 8050 km [5,000 mi] of an interval can consume oil at 805 km [500 mi] per quart with 32,000 km [20,000 mi] on the oil.

Slow accumulation of wear metals can reflect increased oil consumption, not low wear rates because of dilution by more new oil. Low wear rates on engines operating toward the end of the maintenance interval are required to prevent a large loss in engine life to overhaul. Many used oil testing procedures have been developed from quality control tests for new engine oil. In new engine oil, these tests reflect chemically active additives in the oil.

They make sure that each time the oil is blended it contains the correct amount of additives. When these test procedures are applied to contaminated and deteriorated used oil, the data will not be meaningful. Additives take a different chemical form in used oil. Commercially available oil testing techniques do not measure depletion of all the chemical additives in the oil, or determine when these additives stop protecting engine parts from wear and deposits. Low wear metal levels in used oil samples can reflect high oil consumption rates and dilution with new oil added to replace that consumed. Low wear metal levels in used oil samples can also reflect additional contamination and wear debris. Engine oil operated beyond this saturation point often drops contamination and wear debris out as sludge. This results in declining wear metal levels at increasing kilometers [miles] or hours on the oil.

This does not mean that wear rates are decreasing and oil condition is improving. It means that oil analysis becomes meaningless after the engine oil is excessively contaminated.

====

It is part of this document...

http://rawze.com/publicfiles/ISX/Informa...810340.pdf


User's Signature: ->: What I post is just my own thoughts and Opinions! --- I AM Full Of S__T!.
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